Springfield Steam Shipping Co (Lunn & Maccoy), Newcastle

Springfield Steam Shipping Co

George Lunn was the brother of John T. Lunn and in 1892 formed a partnership to found Lunn & Mccoy with a new tramp steamer. It was a further three years before the company’s second ship was built. The final steamer was delivered in 1911 and by 1914 Lunn & Maccoy owned three ships. Two of these were war losses, the third went missing at sea and the company ceased trading.

 

Harrowing Steamship Company, Whitby

Harrowing Steamship Company, Whitby

Robert Harrowing owned sailing ships from 1848 and coastal steam colliers from 1865 and purchased his first deep sea tramp steamer in 1877. Used on the Baltic, Mediterranean and Black Sea trades and over the next two years the Harrowing family expanded their fleet to nine ships and their trade to the Far East and Gulf of Mexico.

Robert Harrowing died in 1900 and the company passed to other members of the family. Three ships were lost during the Great War and others sold so that by 1920 the company only owned three ships. All three were laid up during the depression and were sold in 1932/33, The Harrowing Steamship Co was wound up in 1938.

 

Newcastle Steamship Co

Newcastle Steamship Co

John & Charles Forster founded the company in 1883 with the collier Newbiggin and in 1891 set up the Newcastle SS Co to trade to the Mediterranean, Baltic and Black Sea. In 1906 the company expanded its trade to India and the Far East. Four ships were lost to enemy action between 1914 and 1918 and the remaining two ships were sold and the company wound up.

 

North of England Steamship Co, West Hartlepool. Crosby, Magee & Co

North of England Steamship Co

The company was formed in 1891 by John Crosby and John Magee and operated in the Baltic and Biscay trades. In 1904 the partners took over the North of England SS Co from Stainthorp, Kitching & Co together with their ships and traded to the U.S Eastern Seaboard, Gulf ports and St. Lawrence.


No ships were lost to enemy action during the Great War. John Magee retired in 1927 and the company was renamed Crosby, Son & Co. By 1939 only two ships were owned, one of which was mined and sunk, and the other survived the war and continued trading until 1954 when sold and the company was wound up in 1958.

 

Drake Shipping Co / Lykiardopulo & Co, London

Drake Shipping Co / Lykiardopulo & Co, London

The Greek shipowner Nicolaos Lykiardopulo set up a British flagged subsidiary company in 1912 and named it London & Piraeus SS Co. He purchased the Gwent in 1915 and renamed her Saint Dimitrios but this ship was transferred to Greek registry in 1921. In 1936 Lykiardopulo set up the Drake Shipping Co in London with the purchase of a second hand tramp steamer and bought others during and after the war. Four new ships were purchased in the 1950s but these were either transferred to Greek registry or sold in the 1960s and the British registered Drake Shipping Co became defunct.

 

W. H. Cockerline & Co, Hull.

W. H. Cockerline & Co, Hull.

Walter Cockerline founded his shipping line in 1885 and caused a lot of confusion by naming his ships with identical names to the large liners of the White Star Line. The company traded mainly to the Mediterranean and Baltic and lost three vessels during the Great War. In 1923 Cockerline took delivery of two large tramps for worldwide trading and by 1939 owned eight ships but lost seven to enemy action in WWII. Walter Cockerline died in 1941 and was succeeded by his son of the same name who purchased two standard type ships after the war. After the sale of the last tramp in 1957 the company closed.

 

John I. Jacobs & Co, London

John I. Jacobs & Co, London

John Jacobs purchased his first steamship in 1905 having previously owned a fleet of sailing ships. His first ships were fitted with tanks for the carriage of molasses mostly from Cuba. In 1914 the fleet was used to carry oil as well as molasses and four ships were lost to enemy action. Purpose built tankers were delivered in the 1920 to trade to the Gulf of Mexico and Cape Town.

During WWII four Jacobs tankers were requisitioned by the Admiralty as naval oilers. In 1940 two new dry cargo tramps joined the fleet and at the end of the war, the company owned six vessels. The last dry cargo tramp was sold in 1949 and the tanker fleet built up by the delivery of eight new tankers. In 1960 three new dry cargo vessels were ordered in addition to the tanker fleet and by 1975 the company owned four tankers, one ore carrier, one bulker and a chemical tanker. The tanker companies were wound up between 1975 and 1977. The Pearleaf continued on Admiralty charter until 1986 when sold. Later a fleet of coasters was built up and managed by R. Lapthorn & Co. Rochester. These were sold to Lapthorn in 1994 and Jacobs retired from shipping.

 

Egypt & Levant SS Co. / Thomas Bowen Rees, London

Egypt & Levant Steam Ship Company

Formed in 1893 to ship coal to Alexandria, returning to the UK with cotton from Egypt and grain from the Black Sea. The company was based at Smyrna, Turkey until the outbreak of the Great War when because Turkey was an ally of Germany, operations were moved to Alexandria. Five ships were lost to enemy action between 1914 and 1918 and these were replaced by three old tramp steamers. As well as these, two ex-Russian passenger steamers were purchased but these were soon sold to Turkish owners. The first of three new tramps designed for worldwide trade was delivered in 1925 and in 1939 the company owned three ships. All of these were lost during World War II, but one tramp was purchased in 1941. This ship survived the war but was sold to British India S.N. Co in 1948 and the company was closed.

 

Glover Brothers, London

Glover Brothers, London

The three Glover Brothers became ship owners in 1865 when they purchased the barque W. E. Gladstone and bought their first steamship in 1872. Their primary trades were coal to the Mediterranean, returning with grain from the Black Sea and also the Baltic trade. The company owned four tramps at the outbreak of the Great War of which three were lost. The fleet was built up after the war and by 1927 owned seven ships and traded worldwide. The depression of the 1930s caused the sale of most of the fleet and by 1936 only two ships were owned. One was lost to enemy action and the company was then sold to South American Saint Line with their remaining ship which was also sunk shortly afterwards.

 

Galbraith, Pembroke & Co, London

Galbraith, Pembroke & Co

The company was formed in 1877 to trade mostly to the Mediterranean. A short lived venture into tankers was attempted in 1895 but these ships were sold in 1899-1900. The tramp fleet expanded rapidly and in 1897 were registered under the ownership of Austin Friars Steamship Co. By this time the company was trading worldwide and by 1914 owned thirteen ships, but lost three during the Great War. In 1919 the fleet was sold to Houlder, Middleton & Co who traded the Austin Friars SS Co until 1921 when it went out of business. Galbraith, Pembroke & Co withdrew from ship owning during the inter war years but continued as ship brokers until 1940 when they purchased three old ships. The Basra Steam Shipping Co was formed in 1945 and operated until 1952 when it was sold to Graig Shipping Co, Cardiff. Galbraith, Pembroke & Co returned to ship broking and are still in business.

 
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